Hexagrams

This series of paintings – which I call „I Ching or Book of Changes” – is a continuation of a long-term action to express and transfer my specific messages. In the images, I have used different characters, codes, scripts, and letters, to improve the fabric image and add a kind one mysticism. I want the viewer to look for the hidden texts, to guess their meaning, and in so doing not only see but also „read” my paintings. Read more

This series of paintings – which I call „I Ching or Book of Changes” – is a continuation of a long-term action to express and transfer my specific messages. In the images, I have used different characters, codes, scripts, and letters, to improve the fabric image and add a kind one mysticism. I want the viewer to look for the hidden texts, to guess their meaning, and in so doing not only see but also „read” my paintings. The tendency to accentuate verbal transmission in images has its own explanation. Before I started to paint I was a journalist. As Professor Maria Frankowska noticed, even a color in my paintings becomes a word. Getting to know the Chinese „Book of Chamber” was a powerful source of inspiration for me. I have painted a series of 64,60 cm x 52 cm. Each one contains a different character of „hexagram” taken from the „Book of Changes”. Each hexagram has its own philosophical message. In ancient times, Chinese fortune-tellers gave advice and prophesied based on these characters. The „Book of Changes”, in Chinese I Ching, is undeniably one of the most important works of world literature. Its beginnings date back to mythical times and even today it is being studied by the most eminent representatives of Chinese science. Almost all of the most important ideas of three thousand years of Chinese culture have come from or been inspired by this book. At the same time, the hexagrams themselves have had an impact on later interpretations of the text. The most mature wisdom of thousands of years has been embedded within the „Book of Changes”. Two main streams of Chinese philosophy, Confucianism and Taoism, have their roots in it. It’s not only Chinese philosophy; natural sciences and policy have also treated this work as an inexhaustible source of wisdom. It is not surprising that it was the only one of the ancient Confucian writings that escaped burning during the reign of Szy Huang-ti in 213 BC. Apparently, even policymakers in Japan, a country distinguished by its wisdom and its caution, do not hesitate to seek advice from this book in difficult situations. In consideration of the great historical importance of the I Ching characters, I have tried with great veneration, to recreate them in my paintings.